Dec 12, 2015

Disabled and unadoptable animals play in the snow at a no-kill sanctuary


By on Saturday, December 12, 2015

Goofy and Program are international rescues from the Soi Dog Foundation. They came to Home for Life to receive better medical care, as they are both paraplegic.

Program is now trained as a therapy dog and regularly visits children in domestic abuse shelters and hospitals.

Cats, dogs and even a tortoise are brought to visit children at the Tubman Family Alliance for mothers and children escaping domestic abuse. A little girl is seen here with Momo, a blind cat.

The volunteers at Home for Life quickly form bonds with the animals they are in charge of.

Sammy and Blizzard, some of Home for Life's older residents, show their youthful side playing out in the snow.

Pari is an international rescue from Iran. She was found on the streets unable to walk and fend for herself because of a large and painful lump on her hip. Students at the University of Minnesota veterinary program removed the lump, and now she can walk and run normally.

When people can't give monetary donations, they often donate used goods such as old doggie sweaters, couches, blankets and more. Some of the dog sweaters at Home for Life were handmade by supporters.

From this picture, you can see how there are multiple houses, each with their own outdoor area. Groups of dogs are kept separate so that they are not too crowded.

Though these areas are fenced, Home for Life is situated on 40 acres of farmland. Once a day, the dogs are taken to a larger meadow area where they can really run.

For the animals who don't want to play in the snow, the facility offers several separate buildings to prevent overcrowding. Each building has large windows, heated floors, donated couches and blankets, and soft music.

Dodi is a large Harlequin Dane with epilepsy. She loves running in the meadows of Home for Life, no matter what the weather. Here she is with Flurry, a blind Australian Shepherd.

Spiderman has a disability where he cannot control his bladder. His family loved him, but couldn't keep up with the amount of cleaning necessary. They were told he'd likely be put down, as no one would adopt an incontinent dog. Instead, they found Home for Life, where he has easy access to the outdoors and 24/7 staff to clean up if he does have an accident.

*edit - I mixed up stories between Spiderman and another dog on the website named Meesha. Spiderman, being a collie mix, had the tendency to herd. He began to "herd" local children, and displayed nipping behaviors. His owner received many complaints from neighbors who wanted Spiderman put down for biting. His owner didn't want Spiderman to be put down prematurely, so contacted Home for Life where he knew Spiderman would not be punished for a behavior ingrained in his breed's personality.
Frosty was hit by a car and paralyzed at a very young age. It would be a shame to euthanize such a young dog, so he came to stay at the sanctuary where he was fitted with his own set of wheels.

Indi is a lovely mixed dog all the way from Thailand. When she was a young pup, a monk rescued her from a group of children who attacked her. Though she is paralyzed from the attack, she has a cart that allows her to get around, and she can still play in the snow.

Warm winter wishes from all the critters at Home for Life.

0 comments:

Post a Comment